Improving telescope objective with N-BK7 accessories

Giving new life to an old telescope design is quite possible and not necessarily expensive either.

I designed a generic Fraunhofer doublet telescope in order to design two accessories for it using nothing but Schott N-BK7 glass. Both accessories address the astigmatism in a doublet, flattening the image plane for a wider field of view of the original doublet.

Published 25.9.2015 by Jani Achrén. More marvels here!

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New or improved for commercial telescope optics?

Commercial astronomical telescope optics development has followed a straight tangent for decades now. Focal lengths have shortened while image sizes have grown. Refractive telescopes houses five or even six lenses, making them more and more like over-sized camera optics, driving up manufacturing costs fast. Producing more and more expensive and generic products for smaller and smaller range of enthusiasts does not pay back development.

Published 20.3.2015 by Jani Achrén. More about the topic here.

Fast F/1 reflective Maksutov microscope objective

20150206_2Originally suggested by Maksutov, a Maksutov microscope objective (or eyepiece) is a reverse Gregorian type reflective objective. It has high numerical aperture and has corrected spherical, coma and color aberrations. It requires a field flattener to correct the field curvature, but for on-axis observations, it has a long working distance and short total track.

Originally published 6.2.2015 by Jani Achrén. Read the rest from here.

Ways to trip by using stock optical components

20141107_1Stock optical components are very attractive option for a developer. You get parts ASAP, keep prototyping costs down and one gets fitting optomechanical parts to go, and you can do all by yourself as well. Then again, there are whole factories spewing out same parts to your competitor, with same instructions and howto’s. So it comes down to this: what SPECIAL can you do with stock optical parts? Turns out, quite a lot. However, they might need an optical engineer to pull them off. I’ll go through some examples of common tripping points of stock optical components, and a short description on how an optical designer can overcome them.

Published 7.11.2014 by Jani Achrén, and he invites you to read the rest here.